Darts Glossary C

"C"
Pronounced "See" (to look). In the darts game cricket this refers to the number of high scores that are hit by throwing 3 darts and then convert that to the number of hit darts eg. a treble 20, a double 20 and a single 20 would be called C6 for "6 Darts" that were scored with 3 darts.(3_treble+2_double+1_single = 6)

CARPENTRY DARTS
Darts thrown in such a manner that it misses the board completely and hit the dartboard cabinet instead. Also see "MASONRY DARTS"

CAUDWELL CLASSIC
When a player hits a real low score, usually less than 10

CENTURY
Scoring a 100 points or more after throwing 3 darts. Also known as a "TON"

CHALK
To keep score

CHALKER
A person who keeps the score.

CHAMPAGNE BREAKFAST
Hitting the treble 20, treble 5 and treble 1 by throwing 3 darts(See BREAKFAST)

CHAMPIONSHIP BOARD
A practice dartboard where the doubles, trebles and bullseye are half the normal size

CHECKOUT
The final throw/s to to try and win a game.

CHIPS
Scoring 26 points by throwing 3 darts, hitting a single 20, 5, and 1. Also known as a "Classic", "Breakfast", "Fish & Chips" or "Bed & Breakfast". The term was derived from the price of a typical breakfast in England costing “two and six” at that time.("2 shillings and sixpence" or "two and six"). Interesting to note the number 20 is right in the middle on top of the dartboard with the numbers 5 and 1 to the left and right of the 20. Many people when aiming for the 20 will hit the 5 and 1 instead of the 20.

CHUCKER
Someone who just throws the darts without aiming or caring to aim at a specific number. He just "chucks" the darts at the dartboard.

CIRCLE IT
Players will usually shout "circle it!" when someone scores a single digit score (0-9) after throwing 3 darts. It’s just a way of mocking someone and who plays poorly and were a bit unlucky. To mock the person further, some will draw a fish around the score. Also known as a "CAUDWELL CLASSIC"

CLASSIC
Scoring 26 points by throwing 3 darts, hitting a single 20, 5, and 1. Also known as a "Breakfast", "Fish & Chips" or "Bed & Breakfast". The term was derived from the price of a typical breakfast in England costing “two and six” at that time.("2 shillings and sixpence" or "two and six"). Interesting to note the number 20 is right in the middle on top of the dartboard with the numbers 5 and 1 to the left and right of the 20. Many people when aiming for the 20 will hit the 5 and 1 instead of the 20.

CLICKIDY CLICK
Scoring 66 points by throwing 3 darts. Also known as "ROUTE 66".

CLOCK
Refers to the dartboard game "Round the Clock".

CONVERTIBLES
Darts with interchangeable tips / points. Convert steel tip darts to soft tips and vice versa. Steel tips are normally used ordinary dartboards (sisal type) and soft tip darts are normally used with electronic dartboards.

CORK
Refers to the center of the dartboard, the bullseye. The term originated from the cork of a wine or beer barrel (keg). In the medieval times bottoms of overturned wine or beer barrels were used as a targets. Players throw for the cork or "cork it" to see who throws closest to the bull, to determine who plays first.

COVER
A term frequently used during matches by Sid Waddell (well known British sports commentator), when a player is aiming at the treble 19.

CRACKED
Hitting the wrong place or number when trying to double-out to win a game Sometimes hitting a double 16 or 19 instead of the double 7, or hitting a single 1 instead of the double 1.

CRICKET
Refers to the darts game of cricket where the aim is to hit each of the numbers 15 – 20 and the bullseye on the dartboard 3 times.


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